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Rebuildable for a beginner?


moonbean

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Are yo looking for a tank, or a dripper?

 

Personally if it is a tank, I think the SubTank mini is a great place to start.  If you don't like rebuilding you can always buy coils.

If it is a dripper, I really like th Velocity clone.  Super easy to build on and massive airflow.

Don't forget to pick up an ohm meter when you get your building supplies!

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Are you wanting a RDA or RBA/RTA? What you'll be recommended will depend on whether you want to drip or use a rebuildable tank.  :)

 

Before you start with rebuilding coils, do you have some knowledge of Ohm's Law? Do you have an Ohm Meter?

Must have tools:

1. Ohm Meter

2. wire (I would get some 26g, 28g and 30g to see which one you like better)

3. organic cotton

4. a drill bit or coil winder

5. small torch (optional)

6. ceramic tipped tweezers or needle nose pliers with insulated grip

7. cuticle nipper (optional. You can use scissors or a small wire cutter but I like the cuticle nippers because it lets me get really close to the post)

 

Number 2 through 7 can all be secondary but a decent Ohm meter is a MUST if you're rebuilding. Safety first!  :)

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I want a tank, not into the dripping. I was thinking about the sub tank, it seems to be popular and there is usually a reason for popularity. I am definitely getting an ohm meter and maybe a small tool kit with wire cutter and stuff. I've had 3 bad pre built coils from 2 different makers and suppliers in the past week. Plus a vaper friend telling me how awesome and economical it is. I'm willing to give it a shot, just trying to get some more opinions on what to invest in.

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What kind of battery do you plan to use with your RBA? That also needs to be taken into consideration depending on what resistance you build your coils.

The subtank mini is what I have and it has an easy to build on deck.  :)

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What kind of battery do you plan to use with your RBA? That also needs to be taken into consideration depending on what resistance you build your coils.

The subtank mini is what I have and it has an easy to build on deck.  :)

I've got an iStick 30w, and plan on getting a 50w for the longer battery life.
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I agree, for a starter RTA, the subtank-mini is probably the best out there (right now).  If you like building, there are dozens of good RTA's out there, and if you hate building, you can always buy the OCC coil-heads and still use the tank!  The subtank-mini also uses the regular dual-coil (Aerotank, KPT3) BDC Kanger coil-heads, too!

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Are yo looking for a tank, or a dripper?

 

Personally if it is a tank, I think the SubTank mini is a great place to start.  If you don't like rebuilding you can always buy coils.

If it is a dripper, I really like th Velocity clone.  Super easy to build on and massive airflow.

Don't forget to pick up an ohm meter when you get your building supplies!

Are Ohm meters really needed if you have a box mod that can read the coil build before you fire it up? I've always just used my mod to read the coil build. 

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Are Ohm meters really needed if you have a box mod that can read the coil build before you fire it up? I've always just used my mod to read the coil build

That depends on the mod and how accurate you want to be. I find that the mods I have are within .1 - .2 ohms of what my multimeter reads. That's usually close enough for most builds. some mods might not be accurate.  

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Are Ohm meters really needed if you have a box mod that can read the coil build before you fire it up? I've always just used my mod to read the coil build. 

 

That depends on the mod and how accurate you want to be. I find that the mods I have are within .1 - .2 ohms of what my multimeter reads. That's usually close enough for most builds. some mods might not be accurate.  

It is correct that mods are getting very accurate, much more accurate than some of the older ohm meters due to the fact temperature control must be accurate down to .05 or so to work well.

I still use a dedicated ohm meter though.  It makes me feel better.  Most mods require you to hit the button, to get a reading.  Even though it may or may not apply power to the coil, I still would rather fry a $20 ohm meter over a $50 mod.  I know todays mods have plenty of protection, but it still makes me feel better, and is safer.

I always recommend one to a person who is just learning to build.  People just starting out don't always have the best equipment, and proper backups.

I also still use a mechanical mod every once in a while.  I just like the form factor of a mechanical mod, and the simplicity when using a dripper.

I actually use the meter as a platform to build on.  It is just more stable.  If you are looking for a good meter, and have the money to spend, here is a good one:  USA ohm meters I have not bought one from these people yet, but I really want one of the 3D printed "Fire Meters" 

Edited by jasonculp
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I actually use the meter as a platform to build on.  It is just more stable.  If you are looking for a good meter, and have the money to spend, here is a good one:  USA ohm meters I have not bought one from these people yet, but I really want one of the 3D printed "Fire Meters" 

USA ohm meter is great. I have one of their most basic one but their 3D Fire Meter is a much better platform for coil building. Coil Master is another alternative I am considering. 

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USA ohm meter is great. I have one of their most basic one but their 3D Fire Meter is a much better platform for coil building. Coil Master is another alternative I am considering. 

Wow...that is a great price!  I had looked at those before, but I thought they were much higher!  Thanks for the link.

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When using a multimeter to check a coil you have to remember to consider the lead resistance. this can be determined by touching the probes together and holding them for a few seconds. mine happens to be .25 ohms which has to be subtracted from the total resistance when checking the coil.

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